Day 1 – What are microgreens

In your science journal, starting at the back page, record your vocabulary terms to create a glossary. Lets start with these terms!

  • Agriculture: the science, art, or practice of cultivating the soil, producing crops, and raising livestock and in varying degrees the preparation and marketing of the resulting products.
  • Chemical Compound: a material made up of two or more elements.
  • Chemical Formula: a set of chemical symbols showing the elements present in a compound and the ratio of each element.
  • Deficiency: a lack or shortage.
  • Element: a substance that cannot be broken down into any other substance. Every element is made up of its own type of atom.
  • Germinate: to begin to grow; to sprout.
  • Microgreens: a very small, young, and tender edible leaf/plant showing 2 tiny leaves; a single microgreen is called a seedling.
  • Input: something that is put in; a variable added into a system.
  • Resource: a source of supply or support.
  • Elements: the fundamental substances that consist of atoms that constitute all matter.
  • Molecule: the smallest particle of a substance that retains all the properties of the substance, and is also composed of one or more atoms.
  • Nutrient: a substance or ingredient that promotes growth, provides energy, and maintains life.
  • Observation: a statement based on something one has noticed using their five senses.
  • Photosynthesis: the process by which green plants use sunlight to make food from carbon dioxide and water.
  • Seed: the fertilized ripened ovule of a flowering plant containing an embryo and capable of germinating; (similar to an “egg” that can “hatch” under the right conditions).
  • Soilless Media: a material used instead of soil that provides plants with physical support, allows the water flow, and serves as source of nutrients to allow the plant to grow.

The best way to know is to experiment. This week we start our first experiment by growing microgreens.

What is a microgreen?

A microgreen is: a very small, young, and tender edible leaf/plant. They are usually grown from seed types that germinate quickly and are often ready to harvest in 7-10 days.

Watch this video to understand more about microgreens:

What are we trying to show with this experiment? That plants need inputs to grow.

Every good experiment needs a control group and a variable group. In agriculture, the control group is the group of plants that grow under normal conditions. The variable group is the group of plants that are growing under the condition we are experimenting on.

For example, if we are experimenting on the amount of water, the control group will receive the normal amount of water and the variable groups will receive more, less, or no water at all.

For our experiment, the control group is simple:

We place a few seeds in a clear sealed bag (the control) next to the experimental growing trays. The seeds we put in our experimental trays are the variable group.


 

Draw a sketch of your setup with all the parts labeled. You can do this several different ways:

  • Create a sketch using the drawing program on your computer
  • Draw your setup on paper and then take a picture of your drawing

Submit your drawing or picture by clicking on the button below.

Observations can be made using any of your five senses – hearing, sight, smell, touch, and taste.

Examples of observations unrelated to this experiment are:

  • The smell in a room you just entered
  • The feeling of warm air coming in through a window
  • Watching a solution color change
  • Hearing dry leaves crunch as you step on them

Observe the process of your microgreens growing for the next 7-10 days.

As you make your observations, record any changes you notice in your science journal. For example, near day #3, small green shoots might appear to be popping up from the seeds. Use these guiding questions to help you make your observations:

  • What do you see on the inside of the dome?
  • Are the seeds sprouting at the same or different times?
  • Do you smell anything that’s different from your last observation?

Draw a sketch of your setup with all the parts labeled. You can do this several different ways:

  • Create a sketch using the drawing program on your computer
  • Draw your setup on paper and then take a picture of your drawing

Submit your drawing or picture by clicking on the button below.